Audi e-tron Forum – News, Specs, Pricing & Ownership… banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am having an electrician wire my nema 14-50 plug tomorrow. I read that some people have it connected to a 50amp circuit breaker and some to a 60amp circuit breaker. Does anyone know which is better? I am planning on using the home charging plug that came with the etron.
Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
The circuit breaker size will be based on the wire size used from the panel to the 14-50. To use a 60A circuit breaker, you will need to run 6 gauge wire, but for 50A you can run 8 gauge (cheaper).
50A vs 60A will not affect your charging speed, assuming both go through a 14-50 plug.

I wired my own garage circuit for the ETron level 2, and frankly, a 60A circuit will cost you more for the wire and breaker, but gain you nothing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Ok great! The guy installing it usually does Tesla chargers so I just wanted to make sure I was getting the best charging performance I could out of the garage. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Depending on your voltage at the charger outlet (208-240), the amperage required to deliver 9.6kWh is between 38-44.25A. Your breaker should have a limit 20% higher than your expected load. We have a 50A and it works fine. Per Joe's post, the bigger wiring to bear the 60A will probably cost a pretty decent chunk of cash. To date, the only charger that is bigger is a clipper creek unit which will run at around 65A. (They do have an industrial 80A but it costs $2700...)...

If you are using the Audi module, 50A should do it...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Depending on your voltage at the charger outlet (208-240), the amperage required to deliver 9.2kWh is between 38-44.25A. Your breaker should have a limit 20% higher than your expected load. We have a 50A and it works fine. Per Joe's post, the bigger wiring to bear the 60A will probably cost a pretty decent chunk of cash. To date, the only charger that is bigger is a clipper creek unit which will run at around 65A. (They do have an industrial 80A but it costs $2700...)...

If you are using the Audi module, 50A should do it...
I have a 40A dual pole breaker with no issues. I had a 50A breaker but electrician downsized based on the rating for Audi charger. FYI...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
The circuit breaker size will be based on the wire size used from the panel to the 14-50. To use a 60A circuit breaker, you will need to run 6 gauge wire, but for 50A you can run 8 gauge (cheaper).
50A vs 60A will not affect your charging speed, assuming both go through a 14-50 plug.

I wired my own garage circuit for the ETron level 2, and frankly, a 60A circuit will cost you more for the wire and breaker, but gain you nothing.
If I install a 50 A circuit breaker and use 6 gauge wire instead of 8 gauge wire, will this future prove the charging station for the future and also safer? I am planning to just use Audi charger for now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
660 Posts
I had my Level 2 installed as part of a full panel upgrade. The electrician wired the EV circuit for 50A, but installed a 40A breaker since I was using the Audi-supplied charger. It's been working fine. My understanding is that if you want to go above a 48A charger, it has to be hard-wired---can't use a plug.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
If I install a 50 A circuit breaker and use 6 gauge wire instead of 8 gauge wire, will this future prove the charging station for the future and also safer? I am planning to just use Audi charger for now.
I personally sorta doubt the industry is moving that direction - using 240v 60A charging. These are the very first (meaning: inefficient) EVs, and people are still not having range issues when able to drive a couple hundred miles and fully charge overnight. My etron gains 22 mph of range on a 14-50 outlet, and as EVs become more efficient we will be getting 30, 40, who knows how many mph charge on the same plug.
I also think 60A would be too small of a babystep to matter to all but very fringe residential customers. Even gig drivers for uber, lyft, etc. that are putting on big miles would be using Level 3 chargers at airports or other places they can quickly pick up rides, not going home and trying to charge 20% faster on L2.

I started heading down a rabbit hole, but in short I would not future proof myself against a 10 amp babystep, and residential panels will not have capacity to spare for the industry to make a meaningful jump to 80 or 100 amp charging.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I personally sorta doubt the industry is moving that direction - using 240v 60A charging. These are the very first (meaning: inefficient) EVs, and people are still not having range issues when able to drive a couple hundred miles and fully charge overnight. My etron gains 22 mph of range on a 14-50 outlet, and as EVs become more efficient we will be getting 30, 40, who knows how many mph charge on the same plug.
I also think 60A would be too small of a babystep to matter to all but very fringe residential customers. Even gig drivers for uber, lyft, etc. that are putting on big miles would be using Level 3 chargers at airports or other places they can quickly pick up rides, not going home and trying to charge 20% faster on L2.

I started heading down a rabbit hole, but in short I would not future proof myself against a 10 amp babystep, and residential panels will not have capacity to spare for the industry to make a meaningful jump to 80 or 100 amp charging.
I respectfully disagree with Joe. As an original Nissan Leaf owner back in 2012 I can tell you the 3.6kwh port it had was terribly slow. Since then charging ports in EV’s have opened up, meaning they can accept much higher amp input which means they charge faster. I believe that trend will continue up to about the 80amp level in the foreseeable future.

If you’re installing a new outlet for your EV and especially if you plan on hiding the wiring behind drywall (for example) and also want to future-proof, I highly recommend using a heavier gage 4-3 (copper only) wire which will take you up to 80amps. That same 4-3 copper wire will work just fine plugged into most NEMA 14-50 outlets and 50amp breakers for today’s usage. Then, in the future if things do change where vehicles can accept more “juice” all you’ll have to do is change/remove the outlet on one end and increase the breaker amp rating on the other end - no need to re-wire.

I just did what I outlined above and paid a licensed electrician $250 for everything installed. In my case the 200amp main house panel was right on the other side of the garage wall where I installed the NEMA 14-50 outlet, so maybe 6-8 feet of wiring was all that was needed. And speaking of outlets, the electrician showed up with a really cheap brand. Prior to his arrival I did some research and decided to buy a highly rated industrial grade NEMA 14-50 outlet made by Hubbell. I paid $80 for the outlet plus another $5 for the face plate that fits it, so my total cost for the job was $335. And because I used 4-3 wire instead of 6-3 or 8-3 I’m ready for the future.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I have a 40A dual pole breaker with no issues. I had a 50A breaker but electrician downsized based on the rating for Audi charger. FYI...
I just installed a 40 amp breaker after an electrician friend recommended it. Wanted to see if anyone else was using that set up. Thanks for your insight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
660 Posts
I just installed a 40 amp breaker after an electrician friend recommended it. Wanted to see if anyone else was using that set up. Thanks for your insight.
That's been my setup, using the Audi charger, for over a year. It has worked flawlessly.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top