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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Ideally keen to hear more UK owner thoughts on what range has been for the 2019 version of the E-tron and how is it it to live with one mainly regarding what the weather is like here.

Is it an everyday car or do you have a secondary car for those longer trips?
Given the weather and roads, how is the range - It would be good to hear views from those that drive to enjoy and not drive watching the range constantly. Also good to hear from those who primarily do motorway driving and also those who do both short and long local driving.

In my case and pre-covid...my regular journey pattern is as follows:

Journey 1: Work journey is around 8 miles each way (local roads)
Journey 2: 40 miles each way consisting of around 5 miles local, 30 miles motorway and 5 miles local.
Journey 3: 30 miles each way consisting of around 5 miles local, 20 miles motorway and 5 miles local within London so very stop/start
Journey 4: 30 miles each way consisting of 5 miles local, 15 miles motorway and 5 miles local.

With the arrival of a little one, we will most likely be doing a lot more longer weekend trips so its something to take into consideration.

Thanks in advance
 

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I don't have such structured regular journeys, I go all over the place on various roads as needed.

Unless you are doing north of 30,000 miles a year I really don't think that range is an issue at all. Even then, it would only start to be relevant if your travelling was very concentrated in nature.

I really don't get why there is such a focus on range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks CC

The focus on range is mainly to understand if in the UK we have the right infrastructure or not right now and whether I'd be joining a team of guinea pigs or is it proven now it works.

I suppose the last thing I want is I do Journey 1, 2 and 4 in one go twice over and find I'm struggling to "fill up" on a winters day where range has dropped to in one case on here, 120 on a full charge (during winter)...

I also had a look at zap-map last night in detail to find chargers around all 4 destinations as a test and it seems to be hit and miss. Around where I live, there seems to be only one CCS within a 5-10mile radius and its comments are again hit and miss with complaints of being faulty at times.
Equally however, at home, I would most likely be plugged in so immediate area isnt that much of an issue

It's those kind of thoughts that are keeping me awake :- )

Also if the motorway came to standstill for lets say 20/30/40mins, how does the e-tron react in terms of battery? The fact again using winter as an example the heating would be on, heated seats on, radio on etc...would there be a big drain during that time while stationary and/or slow moving ?

Thanks again
 

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The UK charging infrastructure is far from perfect although I have never really had any problems. Having said that, I speak as someone who is able to charge at home and almost all of my charging is done in that way (at 2p per mile :giggle: ).

EV's in general have no problems sitting at a standstill and consume nowhere near the energy of an ICE while doing so. In the winter, just think about having a one bar electric heater in the car (more than enough to keep you warm). If stuck for an hour that would use 1kWh or about 2 miles of range. And that is for a whole hour, quite a jam!
 

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Hi all,

Ideally keen to hear more UK owner thoughts on what range has been for the 2019 version of the E-tron and how is it it to live with one mainly regarding what the weather is like here.

Is it an everyday car or do you have a secondary car for those longer trips?
Given the weather and roads, how is the range - It would be good to hear views from those that drive to enjoy and not drive watching the range constantly. Also good to hear from those who primarily do motorway driving and also those who do both short and long local driving.

In my case and pre-covid...my regular journey pattern is as follows:

Journey 1: Work journey is around 8 miles each way (local roads)
Journey 2: 40 miles each way consisting of around 5 miles local, 30 miles motorway and 5 miles local.
Journey 3: 30 miles each way consisting of around 5 miles local, 20 miles motorway and 5 miles local within London so very stop/start
Journey 4: 30 miles each way consisting of 5 miles local, 15 miles motorway and 5 miles local.

With the arrival of a little one, we will most likely be doing a lot more longer weekend trips so its something to take into consideration.

Thanks in advance
Hi AJ I would definitely recommend home charging if at all possible.

There is still a grant to potentially reduce the cost of the installation and a wide range of suppliers and charger options (for a brand new Audi E-Tron, Audi will cover the cost of the installation of a PodPoint EV home charger which works well - i dont think this is available for second hand EVs but if you are buying from an Audi dealer i would definitely ask).

There are also a number of electricity tariffs that provide lower cost electricity over night to keep the cost down (lots of variation across providers so worth doing some research on this).

My E-Tron 50 will be delivered beginning of July but we already have an ID4 so we are going 100% EV.

By the way my commute (pre covid although starting to ramp back up now easing measures are kicking in) is 40miles per day (20mile each way) with occasional longer trips up to 160miles. For the daily commute i will have no issues but i have identified EV chargers on the longer routes to top up in. Interestingly my intention with the E Tron 50 is to do short stops at public EV chargers - enough to get me home - rather than waiting to fill up completely.

Good luck.
Hywel
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Brilliant thanks both

Hywel - in your case, how do you plan for longer trips if you get to a point and it is dead? Just like a normal fuel car in that you end up just hopping charger point to charger point until you find one that works?

Reason I ask is I put a route into zap-map of one we could be doing soon (around 202 miles). It displays all the charging points along the way however picking 3 at the mid-way point (M6 Birmingham), 2 were out of order according to zapmap and the one working one was a slow charger.

I think its those type of questions I am trying to answer...could I "risk" a 6 month old baby in the car on a trip like this only to find charging points are faulty along the way or is there enough cover not to now worry about these type of trips.

Local ones including the examples in the original post I think are actually fine especially now considering the fact the home chargers are more than sufficient.

CC's 2p a mile is excellent too which almost very quickly answers economy although I need to look at my provider (via lookaftermybills) as elec is generally very high here in the house due to the gadgets
 

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Hi AJ I would definitely recommend home charging if at all possible.

There is still a grant to potentially reduce the cost of the installation and a wide range of suppliers and charger options (for a brand new Audi E-Tron, Audi will cover the cost of the installation of a PodPoint EV home charger which works well - i dont think this is available for second hand EVs but if you are buying from an Audi dealer i would definitely ask).

There are also a number of electricity tariffs that provide lower cost electricity over night to keep the cost down (lots of variation across providers so worth doing some research on this).

My E-Tron 50 will be delivered beginning of July but we already have an ID4 so we are going 100% EV.

By the way my commute (pre covid although starting to ramp back up now easing measures are kicking in) is 40miles per day (20mile each way) with occasional longer trips up to 160miles. For the daily commute i will have no issues but i have identified EV chargers on the longer routes to top up in. Interestingly my intention with the E Tron 50 is to do short stops at public EV chargers - enough to get me home - rather than waiting to fill up completely.

Good luck.
Hywel
Speaking as someone with an Outlander PHEV at present and an eTron on order I second that you should do home charging if at all possible - makes life so much easier.

Longer journeys could require more planning, but as someone with a little one myself I wouldn't worry about longer trips with the family - you'll be having to stop every hour or so anyway for nappy changes/feeding/toilet breaks etc so could easily incorporate charging with that! Congrats on the imminent arrival!
 

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CC's 2p a mile is excellent too which almost very quickly answers economy although I need to look at my provider (via lookaftermybills) as elec is generally very high here in the house due to the gadgets
The general "go-to" electricity company if you have an EV is Octopus. Five pence a unit 00:30 to 04:30 works out at about 2p/mile.

It takes a while to get transferred though (mine took about 2 months) so time it with your E-tron order.

If you do switch, use the referral code below it will get us both £50 credit.

Octopus

share.octopus.energy/teal-owl-903

Welcome to the E-tron world of EV's :giggle:
 

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Brilliant thanks both

Hywel - in your case, how do you plan for longer trips if you get to a point and it is dead? Just like a normal fuel car in that you end up just hopping charger point to charger point until you find one that works?

Reason I ask is I put a route into zap-map of one we could be doing soon (around 202 miles). It displays all the charging points along the way however picking 3 at the mid-way point (M6 Birmingham), 2 were out of order according to zapmap and the one working one was a slow charger.

I think its those type of questions I am trying to answer...could I "risk" a 6 month old baby in the car on a trip like this only to find charging points are faulty along the way or is there enough cover not to now worry about these type of trips.

Local ones including the examples in the original post I think are actually fine especially now considering the fact the home chargers are more than sufficient.

CC's 2p a mile is excellent too which almost very quickly answers economy although I need to look at my provider (via lookaftermybills) as elec is generally very high here in the house due to the gadgets
Hi AJ

I understand the concern on the longer journeys - you just have to plan ahead and check again before your journey starts - ZapMap and A Better Route Planner are good apps for this. the do repair the Out of order ones

I will say though that the infrastructure is improving (not quick enough of course) and there is a with a new set of Ecotricity rapid chargers (12 I believe all rated at 350kWh) at the Rugby Services J1 M6 for example. The E-Tron, with either 150kWh (for the 55) or 120kWh (for the 50), has a very good charging curve so will keep a high charge rate for longer.

Hope that helps
 

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The general "go-to" electricity company if you have an EV is Octopus. Five pence a unit 00:30 to 04:30 works out at about 2p/mile.

It takes a while to get transferred though (mine took about 2 months) so time it with your E-tron order.

If you do switch, use the referral code below it will get us both £50 credit.

Octopus

share.octopus.energy/teal-owl-903

Welcome to the E-tron world of EV's :giggle:
If you happen to already have solar (as many EV owners do) the cost can be zero :).
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks all - let me answer in orde r:)

Bristolboy- this helps a lot especially comparing to a PHEV as the Q7 55 e was another potential to get best of both worlds however it is coming up around 5k over-budget.
And thanks for the wishes though he is 6 months now rather than arriving in 6 so I'm sure you can understand my pain now :- )

re Solar - funnily enough we do. They came with the house however we have never understood what they do to our bills and so they just sit there sunbathing and the ticker downstairs ticks up when the suns out and doesnt when its night.

CC: Am I looking at Octopus wrong? Just went to it for a quote and on the annual usage based on the estimation on latest bill of 6000 for elec and 1000 for gas, it comes in as £110 a month with unit rate for elec being 19.13p /kWh (4.5p more than current)

I did select standard meter as I have no idea whether it is an eco7 or not (AM110r) however eco7 pushes it up even more.
Is there a special section for EV owners?

Even £110 a month is still better than the £150 currently so it might still be worth switching even with the exit fee.


Hywel: Thanks again this helps too
 

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Brilliant thanks both

Hywel - in your case, how do you plan for longer trips if you get to a point and it is dead? Just like a normal fuel car in that you end up just hopping charger point to charger point until you find one that works?

Reason I ask is I put a route into zap-map of one we could be doing soon (around 202 miles). It displays all the charging points along the way however picking 3 at the mid-way point (M6 Birmingham), 2 were out of order according to zapmap and the one working one was a slow charger.

I think its those type of questions I am trying to answer...could I "risk" a 6 month old baby in the car on a trip like this only to find charging points are faulty along the way or is there enough cover not to now worry about these type of trips.

Local ones including the examples in the original post I think are actually fine especially now considering the fact the home chargers are more than sufficient.

CC's 2p a mile is excellent too which almost very quickly answers economy although I need to look at my provider (via lookaftermybills) as elec is generally very high here in the house due to the gadgets
AJ,

A big issue is Ecotricity (through their Electric Highway) have a virtual monopoly on motorway service chargers. Their units are old and generally unreliable, especially for CCS as they were initially just an alternative standard - chademo, with CCS retrofitted. The good news is the infrastructure seems to have jumped even in the months I have been waiting for my etron to be delivered, with many charging companies rolling out new chargers including on motorway junctions (they can't go on the motorway services due to Ecotricity's contracts!) which definitely helps. Ecotricity also recently took significant investment from Gridserve, with the result that their motorway service chargers are being upgraded throughout 2021 - starting with the new services at Rugby (12x 350kW chargers) as well as replacing chargers at other locations (those at Cobham services on M25 are being replaced this week).

Hopefully that's helpful!
 

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Thanks all - let me answer in orde r:)

Bristolboy- this helps a lot especially comparing to a PHEV as the Q7 55 e was another potential to get best of both worlds however it is coming up around 5k over-budget.
And thanks for the wishes though he is 6 months now rather than arriving in 6 so I'm sure you can understand my pain now :- )

re Solar - funnily enough we do. They came with the house however we have never understood what they do to our bills and so they just sit there sunbathing and the ticker downstairs ticks up when the suns out and doesnt when its night.

CC: Am I looking at Octopus wrong? Just went to it for a quote and on the annual usage based on the estimation on latest bill of 6000 for elec and 1000 for gas, it comes in as £110 a month with unit rate for elec being 19.13p /kWh (4.5p more than current)

I did select standard meter as I have no idea whether it is an eco7 or not (AM110r) however eco7 pushes it up even more.
Is there a special section for EV owners?

Even £110 a month is still better than the £150 currently so it might still be worth switching even with the exit fee.


Hywel: Thanks again this helps too
Reference Octopus for cheap overnight charging you want Octopus Go - you will need a smart meter but Octopus should be able to arrange that!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Interesting this does now make sense regarding the reviews as they all seem to revolve around similar ones.
Cobham is also good news as this is part of a route for 2 of my 4 main trips.

Sorry I should have said, it is a smart meter already
 

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The Octopus tariff you need is the 'Go' tariff.

It has the following rates :

Octopus Go rates
PeriodPrice (inc. VAT)
00:30 - 04:305.00
04:30 - 00:3013.80

They need to put you on a Smart Meter in order to take advantage of these rates. This is very straightforward but it is the thing that makes it take a couple of months to get sorted.


The E-tron sorts out the charging time for you and you will end up with energy usage like this....

2036



In practice, the non-EV bit of electricity consumption is trivial in comparison to the bit when the E-tron is charging.
 

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Etron 50 owner here. 2 young kids, 2 dogs. Solar PV and battery backup on the way(!!).

Range isn't a huge issue from Spring through to late Autumn. Ambient temperatures means even spirited driving will return decent efficiency and range and charge speed. Quicker charge speeds in particular are handy for keeping refills reasonable. Bladders will need emptying before you reach the limit of the car's range so aim for 100kW+ chargers and you'll be able to put another 100-120miles on the range in 20 -30 minutes. Enough time to have a comfort break, get something to eat or just stretch the legs. More 100kW chargers are coming online so this is getting easier.

Range becomes a challenge in winter due to the colder battery temperatures. This limits efficiency and therefore range. But I find the biggest set back is charge speed; your car can only charge quickly when the battery is up to a decent temperature (15°c+ in my experience using an OBD device to view battery temps). Even motorway cruising won't warm the battery very much in colder temperatures. But, the 55 seems to charge quicker in cold temperatures whereas the 50 is quite stubborn and doesn't hit its peak charge rate in winter unless you've really warmed the battery up by charging, driving and then charging again. Must be the chemistry differences and the bigger capacity providing more room for electrons to be shoved in at colder temperatures on the 55.

Also in winter you will likely be warming the car up from the app using the preconditioning feature - this sucks a chunk of battery % depending on your climate control settings and ambient temperatures so try to only precondition the cabin whilst plugged in to power AND whilst using the timer feature with precondition set to on. This way the wall charger will power the heaters not your drive battery.

Once you hit the motorway select efficiency mode and the ride height will drop to the lowest at 65-70mph. In Dynamic it takes a little more speed to drop to the lowest so efficiency on the motorways is a sensible range extender.

Others here have nailed it though. Always have a plan B when looking at charger options.
 

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Etron 50 owner here. 2 young kids, 2 dogs. Solar PV and battery backup on the way(!!).

Range isn't a huge issue from Spring through to late Autumn. Ambient temperatures means even spirited driving will return decent efficiency and range and charge speed. Quicker charge speeds in particular are handy for keeping refills reasonable. Bladders will need emptying before you reach the limit of the car's range so aim for 100kW+ chargers and you'll be able to put another 100-120miles on the range in 20 -30 minutes. Enough time to have a comfort break, get something to eat or just stretch the legs. More 100kW chargers are coming online so this is getting easier.

Range becomes a challenge in winter due to the colder battery temperatures. This limits efficiency and therefore range. But I find the biggest set back is charge speed; your car can only charge quickly when the battery is up to a decent temperature (15°c+ in my experience using an OBD device to view battery temps). Even motorway cruising won't warm the battery very much in colder temperatures. But, the 55 seems to charge quicker in cold temperatures whereas the 50 is quite stubborn and doesn't hit its peak charge rate in winter unless you've really warmed the battery up by charging, driving and then charging again. Must be the chemistry differences and the bigger capacity providing more room for electrons to be shoved in at colder temperatures on the 55.

Also in winter you will likely be warming the car up from the app using the preconditioning feature - this sucks a chunk of battery % depending on your climate control settings and ambient temperatures so try to only precondition the cabin whilst plugged in to power AND whilst using the timer feature with precondition set to on. This way the wall charger will power the heaters not your drive battery.

Once you hit the motorway select efficiency mode and the ride height will drop to the lowest at 65-70mph. In Dynamic it takes a little more speed to drop to the lowest so efficiency on the motorways is a sensible range extender.

Others here have nailed it though. Always have a plan B when looking at charger options.
Yeah pretty much agree with all of the above apart from the dogs bit as I'm, a cat person!
Efficiency mode hunkers the car down if you exceed 50 mph (80 kph) for 30 seconds and won't raise it back to the default level unless you go less than 22 mph (35 kph) for 12 seconds. Dynamic mode requires 88 mph (140 kph) but only for 20 seconds to go down an rises again at 69 mph (110kph) after 30 seconds. Honestly, only you can decide how important this information is to you!
As for spirited driving; accelerating hard up to your target speed is about as efficient as accelerating gently up to it (albeit somewhat less fun) but, if your target speed is more than 70 mph sustained, your efficiency will suffer big time. This is, of course, the same for ICEs but the margin they have on range makes inefficient driving less punitive.
 

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Etron 50 owner here. 2 young kids, 2 dogs. Solar PV and battery backup on the way(!!).

Range isn't a huge issue from Spring through to late Autumn. Ambient temperatures means even spirited driving will return decent efficiency and range and charge speed. Quicker charge speeds in particular are handy for keeping refills reasonable. Bladders will need emptying before you reach the limit of the car's range so aim for 100kW+ chargers and you'll be able to put another 100-120miles on the range in 20 -30 minutes. Enough time to have a comfort break, get something to eat or just stretch the legs. More 100kW chargers are coming online so this is getting easier.

Range becomes a challenge in winter due to the colder battery temperatures. This limits efficiency and therefore range. But I find the biggest set back is charge speed; your car can only charge quickly when the battery is up to a decent temperature (15°c+ in my experience using an OBD device to view battery temps). Even motorway cruising won't warm the battery very much in colder temperatures. But, the 55 seems to charge quicker in cold temperatures whereas the 50 is quite stubborn and doesn't hit its peak charge rate in winter unless you've really warmed the battery up by charging, driving and then charging again. Must be the chemistry differences and the bigger capacity providing more room for electrons to be shoved in at colder temperatures on the 55.

Also in winter you will likely be warming the car up from the app using the preconditioning feature - this sucks a chunk of battery % depending on your climate control settings and ambient temperatures so try to only precondition the cabin whilst plugged in to power AND whilst using the timer feature with precondition set to on. This way the wall charger will power the heaters not your drive battery.

Once you hit the motorway select efficiency mode and the ride height will drop to the lowest at 65-70mph. In Dynamic it takes a little more speed to drop to the lowest so efficiency on the motorways is a sensible range extender.

Others here have nailed it though. Always have a plan B when looking at charger options.
Couple of random questions, that you may (or may not!) know the answers to:
1) Is it possible to "precondition" the batteries to the desired temperature so that they rapid charge quicker?
2) Does efficiency mode actually make much difference when driving on the motorway? In past experience (of other vehicles) such things are not much more than gimmicks, with any benefits insignificant relative to just general efficient driving techniques.
 

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2) Does efficiency mode actually make much difference when driving on the motorway? In past experience (of other vehicles) such things are not much more than gimmicks, with any benefits insignificant relative to just general efficient driving techniques.
According to Audi's range estimator, highway range increases by 1km (less than a mile) when switching from Auto to Efficiency for highway travel (120 km/h). So that is not a whole lot of gain to say the least. I usually leave it in Auto because of this as the highways in the US can be bumpy so I appreciate the additional suspension travel available in Auto vs. Efficiency.
 

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According to Audi's range estimator, highway range increases by 1km (less than a mile) when switching from Auto to Efficiency for highway travel (120 km/h). So that is not a whole lot of gain to say the least. I usually leave it in Auto because of this as the highways in the US can be bumpy so I appreciate the additional suspension travel available in Auto vs. Efficiency.
Useful - I suspected it would be marginal. However, I guess every little helps when the total range of the 50 (which I'm getting soon) is relatively low.
 
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