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The Audi e-tron is one of the best vehicles for retaining its value.

The e-tron, along with the Q3, received the 2020 ALG Residual Value Award (RVA).

The RVA recognizes vehicles in 27 segments that are forecasted to retain the highest percentage of their manufacturer's suggested retail price (MSRP) after a three-year period.

Here's the full announcement of the award:

Audi e-tron and Audi Q3 SUVs receive ALG Residual Value Awards

Industry analytics company ALG announced the Audi e-tron retains its value better than any electric vehicle

All-new Audi Q3 is anticipated to carry a higher residual value than any other vehicle in the Premium Subcompact Utility class

ALG's Residual Value Awards (RVA) recognize vehicles in 27 segments forecasted to retain highest percentage of their MSRP after a three-year period

HERNDON, Va., November 18, 2019 – The Audi e-tron midsize SUV, the first fully electric Audi model, and new Audi Q3 compact-premium SUV, have both earned ALG Residual Value Awards for 2020. ALG's Residual Value Awards (RVA) recognize vehicles in 27 segments that are forecasted to retain the highest percentage of their manufacturer's suggested retail price (MSRP) after a three-year period. The e-tron earned the designation for the electric category, while the Q3 won in the Premium Subcompact Utility segment.

For more than 50 years, ALG has used its market insights, industry expertise and leading analytics to become the benchmark for forecasting vehicle values. In 2000, ALG launched its first program recognizing the automotive brands and products that provide best-in-class value to consumers.

The Audi e-tron and Q3 were selected through an analysis of used vehicle performance, brand outlook and product competitiveness. Eligibility for the award requires a manufacturer to have vehicle entries in at least four different segments. To account for differences across trim levels, model averages are weighted based on percentage share relative to the entire model line.

Audi will be among the winning automakers honored during the Los Angeles Auto Show on Nov. 20, 2019, in Los Angeles.

For more details on this year’s ALG Residual Value Award winners visit http://www.alg.com/.
 

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Well, I know this is an old post, but I saw a message on audi world where someone as a Costco employee claimed to get a Prestige, new e tron for $65000 (or about 20k off list) and a local indy used car (higher end) website that advertised a 2019 e Tron for $65k.

That made me go to KBB and edmunds. Using our VIN number for our Prestige unit w/ rear heated seats, airbags and 21" wheels, I came up with $56k dealer value. That is a $30k hit from list price. Honestly, that is pretty lame (35% hit in less than 12 mos of ownership).

I honestly was expecting far better (especially given the keen optimism of Audi Financials lease residual) which now I almost wish I had taken to avoid the loss of making the mistake of an outright purchase.

Anyone else?
 

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It is worth to me what I paid for it, period. I stopped worrying what others think it is worth as soon as I purchased it. That is completely irrelevant unless I am looking to sell the car. $56k or $65k would be a better deal than I got, but I drive my vehicles for 10+ years. Leasing does not make financial sense AT ALL to me, for my use case.
Every new vehicle takes a massive hit after 12 months. I see people on here all the time that aren't happy with the range or whatever and they sell after a year. This is financially the worst possible thing one can do. If you bought an E-tron for $75k or so and thought you'd trade it in a year later for $65-$70k you're an idiot, pardon my language :ROFLMAO: this isn't how the world works.
And finally, yes, I will care a little bit what my Etron is worth in, oh, 2030 or so ;)
 

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Well, I know this is an old post, but I saw a message on audi world where someone as a Costco employee claimed to get a Prestige, new e tron for $65000 (or about 20k off list) and a local indy used car (higher end) website that advertised a 2019 e Tron for $65k.

That made me go to KBB and edmunds. Using our VIN number for our Prestige unit w/ rear heated seats, airbags and 21" wheels, I came up with $56k dealer value. That is a $30k hit from list price. Honestly, that is pretty lame (35% hit in less than 12 mos of ownership).

I honestly was expecting far better (especially given the keen optimism of Audi Financials lease residual) which now I almost wish I had taken to avoid the loss of making the mistake of an outright purchase.

Anyone else?
For an electric vehicle, you have to take into account fed tax and state incentives on your new car. Even if not every buyer qualifies, it is going to drive down the price of the equivalent used car. So you need to subtract $7500 - $10,000 from the cost of your new car. So you really took a hit of $20K - 23K from list price. And that's assuming that you paid list price. What are your numbers for actual purchase price minus actual tax incentives available in your state?

I agree that the e-tron is not holding its value well, but it is not as bad as your posts suggests. That award is pretty absurd, though. Was the etron out for even a year when the award was given? How could they possibly have enough data to make their conclusion?
 

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Beats me. I am not sure how they would have measure depreciation on a new model that barely had a significant sales volume.

As to the comment about "I don't mind taking a depreciation hit", of course I expect to take a hit on a new vehicle, but not to that extent. For what it is worth, Tesla also benefited from tax incentives but it seems to be holding a better value against the e-tron after a 1 year analysis (20% v. above).

I am not sure I would do the same math with incentives, because not everyone will get any at all (Tesla case in point, if you bought before the tax credit cut off, then you paid a slightly higher MSRP as they reduced sort of the MSRP after the expiry) but your logic would seem to indicate that since a 2018 Model X that did qualify for the tax credit v., similar or same Model X that did not, that second owners cost basis somehow was the same but at the end of the day, the market says that both Model X's are worth $xx,xxxx. Similar case if say you don't pay enough Fed tax (b/c you have a great tax accountant) to consume the tax credit against your owed taxes...not sure how that can be financially sound.

As for Seattle, we have no other incentives from Audi or state. We got only the Fed Credit (7500).

In any case, the residual on the Audi lease was way higher after a 3 year lease term and they are usually pretty close (BMW on the other hand often gives you super optimistic numbers so you have a lower payment and makes leasing more attractive which translates to CPO sales).

Unless you burn money in your fireplace for warmth, I think that you'd actually care to care about your assets value...
 

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Beats me. I am not sure how they would have measure depreciation on a new model that barely had a significant sales volume.

As to the comment about "I don't mind taking a depreciation hit", of course I expect to take a hit on a new vehicle, but not to that extent. For what it is worth, Tesla also benefited from tax incentives but it seems to be holding a better value against the e-tron after a 1 year analysis (20% v. above).

I am not sure I would do the same math with incentives, because not everyone will get any at all (Tesla case in point, if you bought before the tax credit cut off, then you paid a slightly higher MSRP as they reduced sort of the MSRP after the expiry) but your logic would seem to indicate that since a 2018 Model X that did qualify for the tax credit v., similar or same Model X that did not, that second owners cost basis somehow was the same but at the end of the day, the market says that both Model X's are worth $xx,xxxx. Similar case if say you don't pay enough Fed tax (b/c you have a great tax accountant) to consume the tax credit against your owed taxes...not sure how that can be financially sound.

As for Seattle, we have no other incentives from Audi or state. We got only the Fed Credit (7500).

In any case, the residual on the Audi lease was way higher after a 3 year lease term and they are usually pretty close (BMW on the other hand often gives you super optimistic numbers so you have a lower payment and makes leasing more attractive which translates to CPO sales).

Unless you burn money in your fireplace for warmth, I think that you'd actually care to care about your assets value...
Tesla is the exception when it comes to resale value. Somehow they keep the resale value up. Partly I think because of their continued software updates on old models. But I don't think that explains all of it. My wife bought a new 2013 Chevy Volt and I wish we had bought a Model S instead. We would have if we knew that they would hold their value so well. The Tesla price seemed really high to us, but the actual cost of ownership probably would not have been that much higher over it's life cycle. Maybe not counting insurance - I don't know how that would have changed.

The tax credit distorts the market in some obvious ways and some not so obvious. Most buyers buying a car as expensive as the etron will be able to take advantage of the full $7500 tax credit. Say if you buy a new etron for $75K and drive it off the lot and put it up for sale. Your potential buyers could also get a new one for $75K and get their $7500 tax credit. So even if there was no depreciation from driving off the lot, they are not going to pay you more than $67500. Let's say for a typical Audi model depreciation in the first year is 15%. That means that for a gas powered Audi that was $75K new, a 1 year old would cost $63750. So your typical buyer is saying, Ok, I can get a new one for $75K, but if I can get it for $63750 or less I would buy a 1 year old instead. That $11,250 savings is worth not having the new car smell and the full warranty, etc. If they are looking at an etron and can get it new for $75K - $7500 = $67500, would they still pay $63750 for a 1 year old car? They would only be saving $3750. No, they still want a 15% discount.

Of course, the actual market distortion is more complicated than my simple example, but the existence of the tax incentives has got to be taken into account. You might say, well I'll find the rare buyer that doesn't qualify for the tax credit, but can still afford the car. And that can work. I actually did that with my wife's 2013 Volt. We sold it for exactly what it cost us to buy a new 2014 Volt after the tax credit. So it cost us nothing to go from a 2013 to a new 2014. Sold it to a retired guy with great savings, but not a lot of taxable income. But the main reason that worked for me with the Volt and doesn't work for you with the Audi was that there were very few used Volts on the market at that time. Right now if you look at cars.com, there are a good number of low mile etrons below $60K. There are 2 in my area. So that nice retired guy with cash can buy any of those.
 

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This is a joke on resale value. I bought my one edition with 1500 miles on it for $76k and I have had the car for 6 months and car now has 7200 miles. If you follow another thread in this forum, you will see I am having battery range issues and Audi have had my car for 10 days now trying to resolve. I talked to the sales manager tonight and asked him what he would offer me as a trade in against a 2019 Q8 with 11,000 miles. He offered me $40k and $36k less than I paid for the car 6 months ago and this is roughly 55% off the $92k MSRP for the car. I dont know a single car that has 50-60% depreciation on a car less than 1yr old and low mileage. This is fast becoming the worst car I have ever owned for reliability and costs.
 

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This is a joke on resale value. I bought my one edition with 1500 miles on it for $76k and I have had the car for 6 months and car now has 7200 miles. If you follow another thread in this forum, you will see I am having battery range issues and Audi have had my car for 10 days now trying to resolve. I talked to the sales manager tonight and asked him what he would offer me as a trade in against a 2019 Q8 with 11,000 miles. He offered me $40k and $36k less than I paid for the car 6 months ago and this is roughly 55% off the $92k MSRP for the car. I dont know a single car that has 50-60% depreciation on a car less than 1yr old and low mileage. This is fast becoming the worst car I have ever owned for reliability and costs.
Yes, but you are one guy talking to one sales manager at one dealership. That does not mean it is the Official Etron Resale Value.
Your local dealer may happen to have a surplus of used Etron's in the same condition, or the charging in your area isn't as built out, or EVs just aren't as popular in your area, or the manager sees you as being motivated to get rid of your Etron and drooling over the Q8, or dozens of other factors.
Sorry about your experience!
 

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Yes, but you are one guy talking to one sales manager at one dealership. That does not mean it is the Official Etron Resale Value.
Your local dealer may happen to have a surplus of used Etron's in the same condition, or the charging in your area isn't as built out, or EVs just aren't as popular in your area, or the manager sees you as being motivated to get rid of your Etron and drooling over the Q8, or dozens of other factors.
Sorry about your experience!
That is true. Once the car is fixed then I will be looking to trade / sell the car. I have had enough as in the 6 months of ownership my car has been @ the dealership 6x for repairs. I hope that another dealership will offer me more as 50% decline in 1yr is just insane!
 
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