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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So, we’ve gone full electric. We have the e-tron and a model y. I’m thinking I’m going to install two of these, hardwired:
Anyone have any better ideas/alternatives?

EDIT: Meant to select the JuiceBox 48 but it’s out of stock. Any others people like.... 48 or 50?
 

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So, we’ve gone full electric. We have the e-tron and a model y. I’m thinking I’m going to install two of these, hardwired:
Anyone have any better ideas/alternatives?
If you're going to hardwire, why not go with the 48 amp version?
 

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If you're going to hardwire, why not go with the 48 amp version?
For the 40A charger you can use a 50A circuit (#6 copper wiring) and it does not need to be hardwired. The NEMA 14-50 plug will work fine. To go to the 48A charger, you may need to go to a 60A (possibly #4 wiring) circuit. I know that for 50A chargers and above, they must be hardwired. I'm not sure about something at 48A
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I meant to pick a 48 or 50.
For the 40A charger you can use a 50A circuit (#6 copper wiring) and it does not need to be hardwired. The NEMA 14-50 plug will work fine. To go to the 48A charger, you may need to go to a 60A (possibly #4 wiring) circuit. I know that for 50A chargers and above, they must be hardwired. I'm not sure about something at 48A
I meant to pick a 48 or 50. Juicebox only seems to have a 48 and it’s out of stock, at least on their site.
 

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For the 40A charger you can use a 50A circuit (#6 copper wiring) and it does not need to be hardwired. The NEMA 14-50 plug will work fine. To go to the 48A charger, you may need to go to a 60A (possibly #4 wiring) circuit. I know that for 50A chargers and above, they must be hardwired. I'm not sure about something at 48A
That's my point. He said he was going to hardwire. If you're going to hardwire, why not go with the 48 amp unit (on a 60 amp circuit).
 

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I would buy ChargePoint HomeFlex
It goes up to 12 kW or 60 amp
this will add some future proofing
you can also look at Clipper Creek, which goes up to 15 kW in relatively affordable models
if you want outside installation and want a physical locking feature, Clipper Creek is your best bet
 

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2021 Audi e-tron Prestige, Glacier White Metallic
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So, we’ve gone full electric. We have the e-tron and a model y. I’m thinking I’m going to install two of these, hardwired:
Anyone have any better ideas/alternatives?

EDIT: Meant to select the JuiceBox 48 but it’s out of stock. Any others people like.... 48 or 50?
I own a Juicebox, Schneider and Grizzl-e. Where all 3 units get the job done, I prefer the Juicebox and Grizzl-e. The Juicebox gives you the WiFi smart functions and can be connected to power providers for discounts. But the Grizzl-e is the best bang for the buck. The Grizzl-e is also made in Canada and they have great customer service. Let me know if you have any questions.

 
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I just had a new circuit installed, and asked the electrician to provide a circuit that will allow an upgrade to a hard-wired 48 amp box.

He provided 6-ga wire, and showed me the table from the National Electrical Code that states it is suitable for 65-amp service. The key is the temperature rating of the wire. Wire with a higher temperature rating can be used at higher amperage than wire with lower temperature rating. Not all 6-ga wire is rated for 60 amps or morem but if I recall correctly one type is rated for 75 amps.

All components in the circuit, including connectors, must be rated for the desired current. In my case it is the NEMA 14-50 outlet that controls the capacity of the circuit.

For what it is worth, I suspect I will never upgrade. The 40-amp device that came with the car seems to be sufficient. Of course my wife has had the car for only a week, so as we get used to it we may change our minds.
 

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Never is a long time ;) I am already concerned about how to organize charging when my wife gets her EV :)
 

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Never is a long time ;) I am already concerned about how to organize charging when my wife gets her EV :)
Yes, it is a long time! Driving styles can change, and Idaho Power might implement a rate change that promotes off-peak charging. Right now there is no advantage to scheduling charging.

My wife drove about 150 miles in the first week. If we were commuting long distances it could be a whole different story. Of course, if we lived where we had to commute long distances there would probably be fast chargers we could use.
 

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when you go two EV in the house, and one home charger, things will become more complicated ;)
Having two chargers for two EV's is extremely convenient.:cool:
 
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Hehe, I just finished installation of the first one and maxed out credit for it for this year. Maybe next year providing the home charger installation credit is still there.
 

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Hehe, I just finished installation of the first one and maxed out credit for it for this year. Maybe next year providing the home charger installation credit is still there.
CPS, who is the provider of power for the San Antonio, TX area is just starting to offer a $250 credit+$5 monthly credit to control charging during high demand periods or $125+$10 monthly credit to manage scheduled charging for off peak hours. My understanding is that the customer is able to opt-out if your charging needs require it (without penalty). This program is very similar to incentives for smart thermostats.
 

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Yeah, CA seems to be a few years ahead in terms of such programs. Good to know, though, for reference !
 

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Yes, I recently learned about temp ratings for the wiring. I know I have 6 gauge copper but don't know the temp rating for the wire.
 

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Is there any way you can see the sheath of the cable? The type should be printed on it. It can be hard to read. As long as it is a black sheath and NOT NM-B or UF-B you are OK for the higher load.
 

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Is there any way you can see the sheath of the cable? The type should be printed on it. It can be hard to read. As long as it is a black sheath and NOT NM-B or UF-B you are OK for the higher load.
Unfortunately, it is in metal conduit, so not simple to get to. I'll keep the NM-B and UF-B labels in mind. Thanks!
 
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