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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just placed a deposit on an e-Tron Prestige - Navarra Blue and beige. Apparently it is at a port in Houston.

This will be our first electric vehicle, so we are pretty excited about getting it!

I have an electrician coming over this afternoon to see about setting up for charging.
 

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I just placed a deposit on an e-Tron Prestige - Navarra Blue and beige. Apparently it is at a port in Houston.

This will be our first electric vehicle, so we are pretty excited about getting it!

I have an electrician coming over this afternoon to see about setting up for charging.
Congratulations! Great choice! Be sure the cable lengths will reach!
 

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I just placed a deposit on an e-Tron Prestige - Navarra Blue and beige. Apparently it is at a port in Houston.

This will be our first electric vehicle, so we are pretty excited about getting it!

I have an electrician coming over this afternoon to see about setting up for charging.
Congratulations @JHinman! Which home charger are you going to use?
 

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I will try a simple NEMA 14-50 outlet at first. I suspect that will meet our needs. I asked my electrician to set up the circuit so I could install a hard-wired box if I needed to in the future.
Whether you end up using a hard-wired unit or not depends in part on what Amp rating charger you get. If you are installing a circuit from scratch, then the gauge of wiring changes with those requirements. As long as your charger box is below 50A, then you can use a NEMA 14-50 plug outlet. In my case I'm using the 40 A Audi provided EVSE; however, for "continuous use" I have to use it on a circuit that is rated for up to 50A. A 50 A line requires the use of #6 gauge wiring. If you go up to a 50A or higher unit in the US generally the charger must be hardwired, but also the circuit you use must be one for more like 60A--which uses a thicker #4 gauge wiring. So, if you think you might go to a higher Amperage unit in the future, the wiring you use should match your anticipated needs. For example if you wire for 50A to use the 40A Audi EVSE unit, then that circuit should not be used for a hard-wired 50A unit.
 

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I ended up with hardwired ChargePoint unit, and can pull whole 50A from it. I believe the circuit breaker is set at 65A right now (would need to check the fuse box). No heating issues, and charging is super fast as for home conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I believe the 60-amp circuit requires 6 gauge wire, but that is what the electrician will determine. He knows I want the 60-amp service in case I get a “box”.
 

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Go for 65A, that will let you use full 50A out of charger at 80% cable rating. Also, if you want longer cable life, go with copper and not aluminum cabling. It costs a bit more per foot / meter but you will have lower loss on the cable and less heating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It appears that our car will arrive this Saturday! It was at the port when I found it, so it was ready to bring to Boise.

I will not have the charger outlet in place yet, so I will get a chance to see what a Level 1 charge is like. Oh, yay!
 

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Prepare for sloooooow charge. It's sad to see 38 hours time to full but it is what it is. You can always try public chargers in the meantime.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Heh, heh. I will just tell my wife to not drive her new car.

If you never hear from me again you will know I actually tried that ....
 

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It appears that our car will arrive this Saturday! It was at the port when I found it, so it was ready to bring to Boise.

I will not have the charger outlet in place yet, so I will get a chance to see what a Level 1 charge is like. Oh, yay!
For your using the Audi provided EVSE for Level 1 charging, there is a pretty common problem people (including me) have run into. When you set up the charger "brick" for level 1 make sure the box is set to 100%. The box gives you the option for it to deliver at 100% or 50% capacity. On the EVSE that came with my 2019, the Power button is multi-functional. A short press will power it ON/OFF; a long press (3 sec I think) will switch the mode between 50%/100%. Often the charger will power up set for 50%. At Level 1 the supply presented to the car is not high enough at 50% to trigger the car to start charging--most often the car will say it is "waiting for a timer". If you set it to 100% it should be fine.
 

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Also, if you want longer cable life, go with copper and not aluminum cabling. It costs a bit more per foot / meter but you will have lower loss on the cable and less heating.
Not true.
Aluminum (alloy, really) is 65% less conductive (by diameter) than copper. As such, aluminum cable must be sized larger, to allow the same ampacity. In a 75C application, 65 amps, (60 amp breaker, 48 amp load) copper, would require a 6AWG conductor. 65 amps (60 amp breaker, 48 amp load), aluminum, would require 4 AWG conductor. This would be using conduit, or MC cable. Romex is rated differently.

The losses are similar, and aluminum is less expensive.
BUT
Aluminum must use lugs that are rated for aluminum cable (usually rated CU/AL), and should be terminated after dressing with a wire brush and anti-oxidant paste. Some devices still have copper-only lugs. (Example: Tesla HPWC) Most of the 14-50 receptacles should be rated for both.
Almost all high rise residential and commercial buildings have switched to aluminum, as it is lighter, less expensive, has similar amperage/heating losses, compared to copper, for their feeder circuits (large gauge). All of the branch circuits (10 AWG and smaller) are all copper.

Copper is easier to find, and easier to work with, but I'd let the electrician make the call

Notes:
1. Disclaimer: I worked, in the past, for Triangle Wire, American Insulated Wire (both now Southwire), Alcan Cable, General Cable (Both now Prysmian), and Nexans
2. For the non-Americans reading this thread, please substitute Aluminium, Armoured cable/Teck Cable, and NMD where suitable ;)
 

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Go for 65A, that will let you use full 50A out of charger at 80% cable rating. Also, if you want longer cable life, go with copper and not aluminum cabling. It costs a bit more per foot / meter but you will have lower loss on the cable and less heating.
Right. For "continuous use" like charging, the circuit should be rated for 120% of the rated draw of the charger. That said, the increased speed of charging at 50A, compared with 40A, is not huge. I find a 40A charger easily meets my home charging requirements. Now, if Audi were to come out with a battery that had a capacity to deliver 30% more range....that might be another story!
 

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Not true.
LOL, mileage varies, I see. I had to have my outdoor, weatherized aluminum alloy cables already replaced due to lug corrosion. Copper cables, even though in theory rated as indoor only, have no issues at all. Either I had bad lugs done, or just unlucky.

The charger got wired with copper cabling, at least in my case.
 

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I had to have my outdoor, weatherized aluminum alloy cables already replaced due to lug corrosion.

The charger got wired with copper cabling, at least in my case.
My guess:
-Dissimilar metals - lugs steel, conductor aluminum - lugs win. Copper only lugs are often steel
-No anti-oxidant paste applied. This helps A LOT with oxidation issues
-Foreign substance introduced to lugs: eg manure. Aluminum cable cannot be used in barns (per CEC/NEC)
 

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Foreign substance introduced to lugs: eg manure.
I just have to go out now and verify presence of any manure on the side of the house ;)

On a serious note, I suspect it was just poorly done cabling. I keep on discovering funny things done with electrical around the house. Serves me well buying a used house, and not being able to supervise "electricians" when they are doing all the structural cabling. Needless to say, I feel lucky the house has not burned down yet.

On good news, all solar panel installation was at least done correctly, it seems. Lugs, paste, clean connections, etc. so I hope it will last the target age of the installation (25+) and not corrode on me. Keeping fingers crossed.
 
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