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"The upgrade is available for the EQE and EQS where subscribers will enjoy the thrill of 0 to 60 mph acceleration time that is faster by 0.8 to 1.0 seconds."
 

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This needs to stop, I hope people do not support subscription model for basic functionalities. I still remember when BMW tried to charge monthly for CarPlay I refused. Fortunately they dropped that plan. Now this.

I am with @Ps702 I will happily pay one time fee for a feature, but NOT subscription unless it is for data access.
 

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I suspect tuners will break the encryption eventually and enable access to features like this, just like flashing an ECU. Just a matter of time.
yes but it will probably void your warranty, including the battery life warranty.
 

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yes but it will probably void your warranty, including the battery life warranty.
Yep. A tradeoff some are willing to do and have ever since manufacturers started flagging tuned cars. I waited until my warranty expired to do an APR tune on my A6. It transformed the car so much that a part of me wondered if I might have done it earlier had I known.
 

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yes but it will probably void your warranty, including the battery life warranty.
I disagree. Under the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, the manufacturer will have to show that the modifications directly and adversely affected the systems for which the manufacturer is seeking to void the warranty. Since the same systems will operate without adverse affect if the $1,200 ransom is paid to MBUSA, I doubt the manufacturer will be able to meet its burden of proof.

For those interested in the law, the provision of the Act placing the burden of proof on the manufacturer (“warrantor” in the Act), can be found at 15 U.S. Code § 2304(c). It provides that the warrantor’s obligation of repair (in § 2304(a)) “shall not be required . . . if [the warrantor] can show that the defect, malfunction, or failure of any consumer product . . . was caused by damage . . . while in the possession of the consumer, or unreasonable use (including failure to provide reasonable and necessary maintenance).”

I have been a trial lawyer for a little over 50 years and have successfully handled numerous Lemon Law cases for myself (unfortunately) and for friends. It's not my area of expertise, however.
 

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I disagree. Under the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, the manufacturer will have to show that the modifications directly and adversely affected the systems for which the manufacturer is seeking to void the warranty. Since the same systems will operate without adverse affect if the $1,200 ransom is paid to MBUSA, I doubt the manufacturer will be able to meet its burden of proof.

For those interested in the law, the provision of the Act placing the burden of proof on the manufacturer (“warrantor” in the Act), can be found at 15 U.S. Code § 2304(c). It provides that the warrantor’s obligation of repair (in § 2304(a)) “shall not be required . . . if [the warrantor] can show that the defect, malfunction, or failure of any consumer product . . . was caused by damage . . . while in the possession of the consumer, or unreasonable use (including failure to provide reasonable and necessary maintenance).”

I have been a trial lawyer for a little over 50 years and have successfully handled numerous Lemon Law cases for myself (unfortunately) and for friends. It's not my area of expertise, however.
Thanks great info. I don't doubt your expertise, it still would take effort and cost of court time.
 

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I doubt MBUSA would try. Litigation could set a bad precedent and give people a road map around the ransom requirement.
 

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Was waiting for this thread to appear. Totally agree with everyone here, would rather pay an upfront fee than pay a subscription. Consumers need to show those greedy A-holes that this practice will not fly. BMW did revert their decision, now I hope MB will realize that consumer loyalty is more important than profit.
 

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Consumers need to show those greedy A-holes that this practice will not fly.
Plenty of people will still do it, because there are plenty of people who do not care about chump change like a grand a year. Look at how many crypto bros would buy top end G wagons for the prestige to show themselves in it, with zero need for it. As long as marketing stays strong and the model is "desirable", there will be people willing to drop money on something like that. I check out the moment there are any subscriptions involved. It is hard enough to swallow prices of phone and high speed internet services, let alone pay 100/month for ability to accelerate more rapidly in the car one "owns", apparently does not own enough ...
 

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Rich or not, most people won't want to be ripped off. This ransom payment is a ripoff. I hope someone figures out a work around and sells it to everybody who wants it.
 

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Rich or not, most people won't want to be ripped off. This ransom payment is a ripoff. I hope someone figures out a work around and sells it to everybody who wants it.
Hacking it / stealing it isn’t the answer. They realize people are shifting to electric, those cars require less maintenance, those cars may be kept longer and they’ve seen the tremendous success that the software companies have had converting from one-time buy to monthly/yearly license. It’s an obvious move. We don’t have to like it. We show them with our wallet.
 

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Hacking it / stealing it isn’t the answer.
Nothing about reprogramming the logic that controls the operation and performance of a vehicle is stealing. If you buy a car, it is an owned asset that you can do with what you like as long as it does not break local safety regulations. Manufacturers only recourse is warranty implications and even with that, they have a fair amount of burden of proof.
 

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Nothing about reprogramming the logic that controls the operation and performance of a vehicle is stealing. If you buy a car, it is an owned asset that you can do with what you like as long as it does not break local safety regulations. Manufacturers only recourse is warranty implications and even with that, they have a fair amount of burden of proof.
I can’t say for sure one way or another, but would certainly advise that you read carefully before making a decision like that. There may (emphasis on may) be terms of use that apply. These cars are becoming less and less ours despite our “ownership”.
 

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I can’t say for sure one way or another, but would certainly advise that you read carefully before making a decision like that. There may (emphasis on may) be terms of use that apply. These cars are becoming less and less ours despite our “ownership”.
Couldn't disagree more. The only "hold' the manufacturer and distributor will have once we buy and own the vehicle is the warranty. And as the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act (quoted above) provides, they will not be able to prove we have misused or damaged the vehicle if we program it to do what it will do if the ransom is paid. Not paying the ransom is neither misuse nor damage.
 

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Couldn't disagree more. The only "hold' the manufacturer and distributor will have once we buy and own the vehicle is the warranty. And as the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act (quoted above) provides, they will not be able to prove we have misused or damaged the vehicle if we program it to do what it will do if the ransom is paid. Not paying the ransom is neither misuse nor damage.
The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act just protects the consumer for a manufacturer voiding the warranty. I didn’t say I know, I just said make sure you read everything and know what you are and are not allowed to do.
 

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My understanding of the Audi subscription plan (maybe only available in the EU?) is that you have the option to add the feature as part of the one-time price you pay for the car, or, you can add it later as part of a subscription. Is the MB operation run the same way?
 
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