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I wanted to put some quick notes down about the road trip experience as that was a big question when I was deciding whether or not to buy and EV. First, (Disclaimer) I’m already an Audi owner 3 times over, so I’m biased...

I live in Houston and planned a drive to my brother-in-law’s house in Austin for the weekend.
Night prior plan was to full charge the car.
-Resulted in an (known problem) erroneous mileage available for drive of 215miles. That quickly corrected when we set out. Had to drive about 3 miles and turnaround to get something we forgot and finally left the house with 192miles showing.
-Plan was to drive in efficiency ride selected with normal A/C usage. Highway travel most of trip with final destination at 166miles with charging planned at a Walmart at 148miles.
-Expected to have 44miles of excess at destination.
-Drove an average of 70-85mph which cut about 15-16miles of range from calculation... I’d expect that cut until it recognizes your average usage in short and long term memory. (After the trip I’m about 2.0mi/kWh which was accurate when my daily charge shows about 196 now.
-Upon arrival in Austin I realized that Austin,TX does not have good quick charge stations at anything above 50kW, except for Round Rock (ok, too location specific)..
-At about 60miles battery arc turns yellow with battery image yellow, saying reduced range. No change made and decided to stop for coffee to see what it was like at 30 and below, so we made a coffee stop and below 30 miles the arc turned red, with red battery and recommendation to charge immediately. Definitely gets your heart rate up, but how many times do we do the same and drive our car at the red close to empty in a gas car, usually because we know where to get gas. I treated this the same and I’m sure over time we get more familiar with charging stations around us.
-pulled up to the Walmart with 26% and began charge At 50kW quick charge. Spent about 45min to charge to 75miles.
-Drove around for the weekend with about about another 1.5hr charge to get to 135miles before leaving town. My thoughts are this was painful because it took much longer to charge, plan for a spot to charge, than I would have with a gasoline car. We desperately need more 150kW chargers to make this process less painful.
-When leaving for the weekend back to houston I charged to 135miles at the same 50kW (cost spent in total about same as if it were gas / mile driven) charger at Walmart (these seem to be the best) and started trip to my 1/2 way point that had a 150kW charger (Electrify America - thank God I can use my credits now)
-Hit (a little over) halfway point in Columbus off of I-10 and 71 and a really nice charging station there. Arrived at 30% of battery and charged to what showed 100% but only showed 186miles available (due to driving fast at 70-85mph). This charge took 30min, a little long for a stretch your legs stop, however car WiFi helped get through it. I’d really like to see parks at the charging stations if they’re on routes of long trips.. Drove the 60miles to the house and trip complete.
All in all, not to bad of a road trip, for better planning having a 14-50 outlet at family’s house at destination would have helped.. but not available and caused longer than desired stops. Waiting 30+ min for a charge is painful but will get better as more quick charge stations become available. The range of just around 200miles is about 100miles short of where they need to be as an effortlessly functional road trip vehicle. But in the end I’ll deal with it and make it work because I love the car, the look, the comfort, and the features.
-Trevor
 

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Good write-up. That's a really painless trip for a Tesla. No planning needed.
I'm interested in the E-tron, and probably would likewise deal with it for the comfort it offers.

Have you tried L1 charging (120v / 12a) your E-Tron, and if so does an overnight charge cover your commute?
 

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Right, a for full charge. For instance in my Model 3 I'll use about 10% a day door-to-door.
On L1 that might only take 5-6 hours to add back about 7 kWh.

I'm curious if the E-Tron can keep up with my commute without L2 because I'm a renter.
 

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We took delivery of a demo, at a great price in Tampa, Fl, for our Christmas present. [Probably not the wife's idea of Christmas.] Took several 190 mile round trips to island restaurants to verify the battery mileage meter was accurate. Planned a trip to Key West using A Better Route Planner. Fortunately, there are enough Electrify America chargers on route I-75 to keep us going. The trip required 3 stops, the first was just a few minutes to get us to Naples. Naples was lunch and the car was done charging before we were finished eating. The third stop was Key Largo at a strip mall. We walked to a rest room and the car was charged enough to get to Key West upon return. For this 400+ mile trip the e-tron took about the same amount of time as an ICE car as we would have stopped that much anyway. The 150KW chargers keeps the e-tron competitive for long road trips. Tesla-Bjorn says the e-tron is a draw against a Tesla model X for long trips. We are looking at additional road trips after the Virus episode is over.
The e-tron is such a quiet luxuriously ride, the ventilated seats are terrific here in Fl. Can't say enough good things about this vehicle.
 

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Right, a for full charge. For instance in my Model 3 I'll use about 10% a day door-to-door.
On L1 that might only take 5-6 hours to add back about 7 kWh.

I'm curious if the E-Tron can keep up with my commute without L2 because I'm a renter.
L1 is about 0.8KW/Hr. An e-tron will probably use about 12KW for 30 miles so yes 110V would recharge the e-tron back up over night.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Good write-up. That's a really painless trip for a Tesla. No planning needed.
I'm interested in the E-tron, and probably would likewise deal with it for the comfort it offers.

Have you tried L1 charging (120v / 12a) your E-Tron, and if so does an overnight charge cover your commute?
The comfort options and overall cost out the door during purchase is what drove to the e-tron vice the X. However the range does make things interesting. on the 120V side, when I plugged in it said 2days and 7 hours to a full charge from around 30%? I think that's where it was at after driving around all day.
 

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My wife and I went on our very first road trip over the Labor Day weekend! It was approx 500 miles each way starting in Northern New Jersey to Bar Harbor, Maine. It was quite the adventure mainly b/c there are no level 3 high speed chargers near Bar Harbor (only a few level 2 chargers) and to top it off, halfway through our trip there, I realized I had left our etron charger in the garage (the hotel we were staying at had a NEMA 14-50 outlet I was planning to use)!!! Thanks to the PlugShare app, I was able to find a museum that was a 23-minute-walk away from our hotel that offered free level 2 charging. Ended up using it twice, first to have enough charge to drive around town, and again before we left so we had enough range to make it to the first available level 3 fast charger. Here are my takeaways/tips from this ordeal for everyone:

1. Download the PlugShare app now, set up an account, meticulously plan your trip, and "Check In" when charging at all public stations
This app will allow you to look up nearby chargers, plan routes, create "Trips", and also "check in" while at a charger. On the road, you'll quickly come to realize that many stations are constantly undergoing repairs or broken. In order for you to successfully make your long road trip, it's important you meticulously plan your route and ensure the stations you've selected have working chargers evidenced by successful check-ins by others in recent days. Avoid stations that haven't had a check-in in over 30 days as its status is uncertain.

I know its a little work "checking in" when you're at a station but it really provides the community invaluable information regarding which stations are up and running, how recently someone was able to successfully charge, and any other observations made (ie - potentially shady area, avoid if alone, etc). "Checking in" also informs others who may have considered going to that charger that the station stall you are using is currently occupied. I believe this is good EV community etiquette - I had two instances where a Tesla was charging at the only working station and I had to return in the morning to get my charge. Had these EV owners checked in on the app, I would've known when to go and not waste time.

2. 160 miles is a safe distance in between charges
Contrary to your Audi dash telling you that you have over 200 miles of range, on the highway when you're traveling 65+ mph, your true ranges drops close to 185 miles on a normal summer day. See below post by where @4Rings links a motortrend article that found similar mileage in highway driving with the AC on (176 miles). In the winter, I'm sure its even lower. In between charges, should you end up coming to a dead station after 160 miles, you still have roughly 20-25 miles or range to find the next station.

Motor Trend recently tested the e-tron's range to see how it compares to its EPA estimate and to Tesla.

Here's what they wrote. https://www.motortrend.com/news/audi-e-tron-electric-suv-range-testing/
3. Download all of these Charging network apps and sign up for accounts
1. Electrify America (150kwH charge capability) - they often have stations under repair which is annoying but their Level 3 DC Fast Chargers supplying 150kwH cannot be matched. You can recharge your etron from 20% - 80% in literally half an hour, for full add another 10/15 min. Many are located in specific Walmart parking lots. All new etron owners get 1000 kwH free for 4 years through the Audi app - no need to use EA app until you've depleted credits
2. Chargepoint (65kwH charge capability) - much slower than EA but they are 2nd fastest at 65kwH. Expect to charge from 20% - Full in roughly 1 hour and 45 minutes. Ensure you set up an account before arriving at one of their chargers. I spent a good 10/15 minutes just trying to "load" credits onto a new Chargepoint account as all my credit cards kept getting declined - no idea why. Finally got account set up for payment through PayPal
3. EVGO (50kwH charge capability) - slowest of the 3 but useful when you're in a pinch. I used their charger to get more range to reach the next EA charger - I advise you to do the same and don't fill up there as it'll take a while. Also just sign up for their free subscription, absolutely no reason to opt for their paid subscription

4. Don't forget to pack your charger (9.6kwH charge capability)
Many owners use their Audi supplied charger as their main Level 2 charger at home and may even have it mounted on their garage wall. Do not forget to pack it when traveling! It can come in very handy when in an area like bar harbor and options are very limited. Do your research finding hotels that have a NEMA 14-50 outlet or better, a dedicated level 2 charger

Hope this helps someone that is planning on road-tripping in their etron! It's a wonderful and luxurious car but after this trip, wife and I think we will get a Tesla down the road for road trips b/c of their better range and better charging infrastructure. This will be many years down the road and after our ICE sub-compact SUV dies. We still love the etron however and it doesn't change our feelings about our etron purchase - no regrets :)
 

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Thanks for sharing! Great write up and tips! I know range and charging networks are the biggest concerns with an E-Tron or any EV. I've also thought about a Tesla for road-trips, but then I'd have to drive a Tesla. Hah.

The lack of wind and road noise, comfort, and luxurious features of the Audi is worth the trade-off! At least for now. If we need to do a lot more road trips in the future (quite rare these days), I fully expect our next EV (hopefully Audi) will have far more range. And the charging network had better have improved as well.

Or worse case, you could grab a non-EV rental for the occasional long drive where you don't have time for charging. In fact, last I checked, Audi was offering 1 week of free Audi Silvercar rental for new E-Tron buyers as well as discounts for new customers. Just a thought. ;)
 

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The next time my wife and I are in the market for a new car will be a while and hopefully by then, the non-Tesla major car manufacturers will have improved their EV range and, as you have mentioned, improved their charging network. Tesla will have come out with new cars too, which will be intriguing.

As of now however, we do still have our ICE SUV. Unfortunately it has fabric seats, no dual climate control, and none of the other luxury features of the eTron. Its a basic transportation vehicle but gets the job done. We will consider driving it for our next road trip :)
 

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Want to hear your experience charging on the road and tips you can share. I specified US only because the charging infrastructure is very different between countries.
 

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I will start with my own experience.

I picked up my second eTron from LA a couple of weeks ago and had to drive 400 miles back to San Francisco. Having a plug in hybrid before and the first eTron for a month I am not exactly an EV virgin. However I have only done charging at home so I knew I would have to do some crash learning on the road.
I started my journey at 60% after driving from the dealer to the place I stayed overnight. I wanted to ‘filled up’ before hitting the road so I googled charging stations near me. First one I went to had a slow charger. It would take the better part of the day if not the whole day.

Lesson 1 learned: only look for fast chargers.

Googled and found one 5 miles away. Got there and no charging station could be found. Learned from past observations that non-Tesla charging stations are usually inconspicuous with no signs or directions. I drove around and around the small shopping mall but nothing.

Lesson #2: don’t trust google for charging station locations.

Then I remember the sales guy told me about the ChargePoint app. Downloaded it and found another fast charging station. Third time is a charm. Found this GreenLot charging station but wait, it doesn't take credit card. I had to download the app, set up the account, payment method, etc, etc. Trying to figure all that out while standing in 90+F degree sun is no fun. Finally got the app going and then realize it was a fast charger but not the DC super fast type. Charge time was 48 mins to 100%.

Lesson #3: There are multiple charging networks and each charging station works a little differently. Not all stations are credit card friendly.
Lesson #4: Not all fast chargers are created equal. Need to look for DC fast charger and pay attention to charging speed; eTron can take up to 150-KW.
Lesson #5: Charge rate from 80% to 100% is much lower than from 20%-80%. So if 80% is good enough to the next station better not fill up to 100%.

With almost an hour to burn I walked around the mall but most things were closed because of Covid-19.

Finally on the road to SF after almost 2 hrs of charging detour. According to the eTron trip planner, first stop would be near Bakersfield along highway 5 and the other further up north in Panoche. Both stop would take 30-35 mins. I was hoping for one stop but the eTron planner doesn’t want me stranded so the planning is a bit conservative. I should arrive home with 25% left.

First stop was near Bakersfield. The charging station was a few miles from the highway. There were 4 charging stations and two of them were DC superfast chargers. This one was electrifyAmerica network so the GreenLot app was no good for this. Then I remember reading somewhere Audi is partnering with electifyAmerica and you can charge using the MyAudi App. Figured how the station works, plugged in and tried to start the charger with the app. The app would just spin and then blank screen. In the meantime the charging station timed out and wanted me to unplug. Tried 4-5 times with pluging/unplugging I finally gave up and tried using credit card. Still no luck. Now the station would just spin and spin. Moved to the other DC-charger and thank goodness credit card finally worked there. It was over 100F in Bakersfield and there was no shade over the charging stations. They are also next to the dumpsters and I had flies attacking me and got into the car.

Lesson #6: non-Tesla DC fast charges are few and far even on major highways. It would have been absolutely terrible if there was a queue of only a couple of cars in front or if a charger is down.
Lesson #7: can’t count on all chargers being operational even if the app says so

Finally on to the next stop after over an hour later. I could definitely use some coffee by now so hoping there would be a Starbucks at the next stop. Again the electrifyAmerica charging station is out in the boonies next to a bunch of dumpsters. No Starbucks, just a small convenience shop and couple of fast food joints.

Lesson #8: you don’t choose where you go fill up like a gas station would; you get what get at the charging station.

Made it back home with 20% left. Didn’t get stranded so I would call the trip a success and a fun adventure in a twisted way. My wife commented I look sunburned. I didn’t expect to be standing in the hot sun for hours. Next time I will bring a big sun hat and sunscreen. Actually there probably won’t be a next time. From this experience I concluded the eTrons is best staying local. It’s a shame as it is such a comfortable and quiet car on the freeway. Surely my experience would get better with more practice but it would still take considerable amount of charging time and my itinerary including beverage and food choices would be dictated by where charging stations are. Charging experience is probably where Tesla is way better than everyone else. Tesla has many more charging stations so having one or two stations out of commission is not catastrophic. For the stations I went to, having one down means 50% capacity taken out. Both down means calling AAA. In addition Tesla stations are usually in better locations, some even have waiting lounges. Never been to one but it surely sounds better than walking around from one fast food joint to another.

So in conclusion, my eTrons are staying local.
 

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Thanks for starting this thread @Quattro. If somebody wants to create one for another region, go for it. ;) We can sticky them for now as I know many folks will be interested in the "real-world" road trip experience of the E-Tron as they consider going electric.

It will also be interesting to see how experiences change as folks learn new tips, range improves, and charging networks expand.

EDIT:
Also, here are some of the more recommended EV charging resources in the US:
 

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Yes, the whole charging infrastructure is a growing mess. Not only the above issues, but some chargers charge you by TIME, while others charge you by KWH. At least California is leading the way to force all the companies to charge by KWH. This is done, by the way, because in some States if you charge anyone by KWH, then you have to be certified as a Public Electrical Utility, so if you charge by time, the company avoids fees and paperwork.
 

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Having a Tesla I definitely agree their charging system is incredible. That said, ABRP and Plugshare are still must-haves. For an efficient trip you need to plan around the charge stops, which ABRP will give you. On this particular trip there are two major routes, but with a sizable dead zone in the middle.

Plugshare is more to get a 'lay of the land.' After entering your vehicle, it has two great sort options: kW (120+ is 'fast'), and lodging. Staying at a hotel with charging saves a ton of time on trips.

The ratings are also useful to find problematic stations. EA is active on the app, so if you get a weak charge, or find a plug that doesn't work - make sure to leave a check in.

Screen Shot 2020-10-04 at 12.05.15 AM.png
 

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first of all, i agree that us non-tesla fast charging infrastructure is a mess :)
My own experience (us east coast) has been that with careful research you can actually make long distance trips
The most helpful tool i was able to find was PlugShare app.
It shows fast chargers from all providers and most importantly shows recent reviews and check-ins from users
Using this, you can map an efficient route to your destination with minimal charging stops
And yes, before you go, download the app for every charging network and try it locally
One more positive thing is that fast chargers are usually clustered around bigger settlements and thus you should have a backup should your first choice malfunction or be full
 

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Merging other stories here. Let me know if I missed any from the US. ;)
 
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